Amanda Roe, ND

Natural Medicine Expertise

Training With the Flow by Amanda Roe, ND March 15, 2017

Filed under: diet,nutrition,running,women's health — tollecausum @ 10:08 am
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Having a uterus and ultrarunning is generally pretty rad. There is nothing like running into some badass women in the woods, tearing up the trails and having a great time. We push each other to be better, dream bigger, run stronger. How many times have you been digging deep for the next internal power surge to arise and been inspired either by thinking of another woman runner, or witnessed within yourself that core sense of knowing you’ll rise to the occasion? We lift one another up in this sport. In the interest of elevating women in sports, let’s lift the mystique of that monthly visitor that can throw a bit of a wrench into an otherwise finely tuned machine. Periods run interference on even the best training schedules and can set you back a week or two at a time. Most of us are already balancing our running with career, family, and the odd (gasp) other pastimes besides running.

Raise your hand if any of the following scenarios sounds familiar. I know.

“I was packing the car up a few months ago to leave for an early morning race. I ran back in the house to pee only to find that Aunt Flo came by to wish me luck. The race was set to start in 2 hours. I thought she was coming on Tuesday!”

“I’m scheduled for a long run on the weekend, but have been bleeding and cramping for the past two days. My legs feel weak, my back hurts, and I would eat a Taco Bell Party Pack faster than a gaggle of teenaged boys right now. How can I cement the wherewithal to get 20 miles in bright and early? My 50K is 6 weeks.”

“Looking ahead at my race calendar, again I count the weeks to go: seven weeks until the next race. I have my period this week. It should be 8 more weeks until ‘that time of the month’, but it’s going to be a close call. Can’t I just plug it up and pretend it’s not happening??”

There are so many factors that affect our biggest days out there racing and training, and uterine behavior (or misbehavior) doesn’t need to be another big unknown. Getting a general sense of your cycle can empower you to do all the right things to guide your body toward training and racing strong, before, during, and after your period.

HERE COMES AUNT FLO: Running before period (Days 15-28 of cycle)

Hydration is key. There are a lot of hormones leaving the system during this time, and it can feel akin to a detox. For women who experience premenstrual headaches, be extra sure to keep those electrolytes balanced and the excretion (ahem, peeing and moving your bowels) humming along. If you’re up for it, a trip to the sauna or hot yoga class can aid with the processing.
Decreasing inflammation is also vital, particularly if you get bad cramps or have endometriosis. Focus on foods high in essential fatty acids, known for decreasing cramping and clotting, like olives and olive oil, avocado, nuts, seeds, fatty fish (like salmon, cod and halibut). Decrease coffee, alcohol, and limit sugar, as these amplify inflammatory pathways in the body.

SHARK WEEK: Running during period (Days 1-7 of cycle)

Use your discretion in determining when and how much to run. For some women, the increased circulation from exercise actually helps relieve cramping and clotting. For other women, running can cause more fatigue. Eat iron-rich foods: dark leafy greens, eggs, beets, poultry, and beef. Combining iron-rich foods with Vitamin C or foods high in Vitamin C (citrus, spinach, berries) will help your body absorb more iron naturally. Magnesium can also help a bunch. Epsom salt baths are great way to relieve muscular tension from cramping, low back pain, and leg pain.

GETTING OFF THE COTTON PONY: Running after period. (Days 7-14 of cycle)

Sleep is your buddy, and you’re likely to be feeling much better now that your body is resetting. Treat it to some daily nourishing blood-builders like spinach, black beans, dates, and carrots to stay on top of your game. Run strong, and tear it up out there, my friends!

 

Top Docs Portland January 1, 2017

Filed under: Uncategorized — tollecausum @ 10:59 am

It is with a heaping TON of gratitude to my colleagues and patients that I’m sharing being voted a Portland Top Doc for 2016.  You guys fuel my passions and my constant quest for knowledge to better serve you.  Big hugs and high-fives all-around!!!

TopDocs-2016 portland.jpg

 

 

Radiation protection, re-visited April 19, 2012

It’s been just over a year since the Nuclear meltdown in Japan.  We had a lot of concerns about radiation for a month or two, and then things sort of simmered down.

However, I recently had a patient ask me what she could do to protect her young children from the effects of increased radiation in our atmosphere.  There’s a lot out there on the web.  Weeding through all of it to determine an effective set of guidelines for families with little ones (or pregnant ones!) has been my pet project for the past few weeks.

Without further ado, I present “Dr. Roe’s Radiation Protection Plan”

1. An apple a day.  Pectins (found in apples) are probably the most well-studied food source for radiation protection, even after exposure has occurred.  People in the Chernobyl radiation zone have been advised for years and years now to consume apples on a regular basis to help the body absorb and eliminate excess radiation.

2. Eat iodine-containing foods, and keep a source of iodine on hand for your family in the medicine cabinet.  There is no need to supplement Iodine on a regular basis, and this can, in fact, put people over the age of 40 at risk for thyroid cancer.

3. Add Spirulina to Smoothies or, even better, applesauce a few times per week.  Spirulina also shows the ability to bind radioactive isotopes so that the body can more readily eliminate them.

4. Find a reputable source for Kombucha tea, and drink it 3-6 times per week (8oz serving).  Besides, the hot-link there, I was able to easily find lots of evidence to show the anti-oxidant, free radical scavenging, radiation-busting effects of this ancient beverage.

5. Most of all, be healthy.  Eat whole foods.  Drink water.  Take a daily multivitamin (a good one!!!!)  Avoid sugar and processed foods to keep all of your organ systems intact and functioning properly.  Your body’s ability to combat radiation exposure is only as strong as it is healthy.

So there you have it, the naturopathic doctor-approved, weeded-out version of Radiation Protection, 101.

 

Pap happy. April 16, 2012

Guess what?  The guidelines have changed for Pap smears!  I know that coming in for your annual exam is about as fun as going to the dentist for a filling, but I am proud when you ladies come in and take care of business.  I like checking in with you each year.  However, the guidelines have changed, and it means we won’t be seeing eachother quite as often.

To summarize:
Under Age 21: no pap smear, no HPV testing
Age 21-29 Pap every 3 years
Age 30-65 Pap + HPV every 5 years

Here’s a nice article written by a colleague, Aviva Jill Romm, MD.  This is a great summarization of the new guidelines.

If you want more info from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, click here.

 

On being human. February 29, 2012

This is an absolutely fabulous article written by a mama on self-forgiveness and being human.  I love it.  I think if we keep in mind what it means to be human, to replenish our stores of grace, and to forgive ourselves when we feel we haven’t been our best selves or parents….we can have healthier happier dynamics at home and in the world.

Give it a read!

 

Gear up for flu season February 15, 2012

Filed under: plants,remedies — tollecausum @ 11:11 pm
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Well, the flu is back, and it might be H1N1, it might be H2N3.  Either way, it’s landed and it’s yucky.  A few years back when H1N1 hit, we had very few cases in our clinic using a protocol of Elderberry extract, Probiotics, good hygiene, and dietary modification.

  • Elderberry was proven to bind to and prevent H1N1 infections in vitro, according to a 2009 study published on NCBI/PubMed.
  • Probiotics enhance the gut-associated lymphatic tissue, thereby increase immune function.
  • Good hygiene goes without saying, but seriously: WASH YOUR HANDS and DON’T SKIMP ON SLEEP!
  • Keep your sugar consumption very low, and avoid known food sensitivities.

With these in mind, stay healthy…and come see me if you’re not!

 

 

Green Sprouts and New Baby! September 24, 2011

Filed under: activities,birth,inspiration,kids,parenting,pregnancy — tollecausum @ 10:54 am

Green Sprouts Organic Baby and Family Fest Presented by the ReDirect GuideYay!  Tomorrow is the Green Sprouts fest!!  Please go check it out.  Dr. Jenny will be there at our table while I have a snuggle at home with our new baby boy.  He’s just over a week old, so we won’t be attending this year.  We are doing great!  We had an amazing waterbirth at home.  Our family feels truly blessed.