Amanda Roe, ND

Natural Medicine Expertise

Working in working out May 3, 2017

Filed under: activities,running,Uncategorized,women's health — tollecausum @ 12:39 pm
Tags: , ,

 

You know how sometimes, you can plan for something, work at it a bunch, and still have it fall flat on its face?

That was me this time last year.

I picked the Tillamook Burn Trail Race as my first 50K distance race.  It’s beautiful, or rather….brutiful.  With over 7000 ft elevation gain and loss over 30 miles of lush old growth forest, I really had my work cut out for me when I found out I had gotten a spot from the waitlist for this race.

I toed the line last spring, started strong, but then a few hours in, the terrain started to eat me alive.

I realized around mile 16 that my finish was in jeopardy.  With each mile completed, it actually started to feel like the finish line was moving away from me.  There was a 5pm cutoff for the race.  I was dangerously close to going over time.  The final 1450ft ascent before the finish, I knew it was over for me.  They let me through the last aid station so I could complete the distance and cross the finish line.  My family was waiting there for me, and it didn’t matter to them that I missed the official time by 14 minutes.  It really only mattered to me.

Turns out it mattered to me a LOT.  Way more than I understood until the past few weeks.

I took the fitness attained from training for that race and churned it into the next race, and the race after that.  I volunteered at other races and got inspired.

I went to grown up up running camp and highlighted my areas of weakness so I could hone those skills and become a better athlete.

I cross-trained when I could (read: grabbing those 5-10 minute slots to kettlebell, stretch, squat, handstand, lunge, or whatever!).  I ran in the rain, the mud, the snow, the ice, the numerous mini-landslides, in jeans, pajamas, snow gear…to make it happen.  For me.

I studied the Tillamook Burn course this year and chunked it down into 8 sections.  I set time goals for each checkpoint.

Do you know what?  It worked.  I finished 38 minutes faster this year, and the day was a pure joy.  365 days and a lot of work later, I finished that bad boy.

Set goals, huge goals, and work towards them every day.  Work it into your day.  Stay focused. It’s important to me that my kids see me doing this valuable self-care, even though I’m balancing parenting them and seeing my patients.  Be patient.  Do many small things.  I promise, it’s worth it.

_DSF8108.jpg

The sweetest finishes sometimes take a long time to get to.

 

 

 

 

Yoga for anxiety April 26, 2017

My very dear friend, EB Ferdig is a genius when it comes to helping people manage anxiety with yoga. Unknown

Her next series starts on 5/3, with a discount if you register by the end of today.

Series cost is $150 – but only $99, if registered by April 26!
Space limited to 10 participants, register today!

The five-week series will be taught by E.B. Ferdig, E-RYT50, a yoga therapist who has been helping people with anxiety for over ten years. E.B. is highly compassionate and knows personally what it’s like to live with anxiety. She will guide you, as she has hundreds of others to a place of greater peace, clarity and personal power.

Questions? (503) 333-5484 or email: ebferdig@gmail.com

Hit this link to sign up and begin feeling relief.

 

Green space exercise April 19, 2017

There are a growing number of articles that show a clear connection between increased mental wellbeing, stress relief and even immune system activation. when exercise is conducted in forested green spaces.

In the UK and Japan, they study this phenomenon extensively, citing active components that are directly responsible for all these positive effects.  That fresh pine smell, for example, is actually alpha and beta pinene.  These naturally occurring volatile aromas increase Natural Killer cells, which help us battle things like viruses and tumor cells.

You don’t have to smell the woods, to get the benefit though.  In the UK, researchers found that just looking at peaceful, natural scenery while exercise increased several health parameters.

So, exercise in nature if you can, but also consider switching from zoning out with a TV show on the treadmill to treating yourself to some seriously beautiful views instead.

IMG_1771.PNG

Li Q1Kobayashi MWakayama YInagaki HKatsumata MHirata YHirata KShimizu TKawada TPark BJOhira TKagawa TMiyazaki Y. Effect of phytoncide from trees on human natural killer cell function. Int J Immunopathol Pharmacol. 2009 Oct-Dec;22(4):951-9.

Li Q1, Kobayashi MInagaki HHirata YLi YJHirata KShimizu TSuzuki HKatsumata MWakayama YKawada TOhira TMatsui NKagawa T. A day trip to a forest park increases human natural killer activity and the expression of anti-cancer proteins in male subjects. J Biol Regul Homeost Agents. 2010 Apr-Jun;24(2):157-65.

Humpel N., Owen N., Iverson D., Leslie E., Bauman A. Perceived environment attributes, residential location and walking for particular purposes. Am. J. Prev. Med. 2004;26:119–125. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2003.10.005. [PubMed] [Cross Ref]

De Vries S., Verheij R.A., Groenewegen P.P., Spreeuwenberg P. Natural environments—Healthy environments? An exploratory analysis of the relationship between greenspace and health. Environ. Plan A. 2003;35:1717–1731.

 

Allergies April 11, 2017

Filed under: allergy,nature caure — tollecausum @ 9:11 am
Tags: , ,

Allergy season is back in the Pacific NW after a long, cold, wet, windy winter.  Beyond Claritin, Zyrtec and Benadryl, the best way to combat the itching, sneezing, runny nose days and nights is to abide by the LAWS of Allergy Hygiene.  Decrease your exposure, decrease your symptoms!

Allergy hygiene:

  • Keep your windows closed in your home and car to avoid letting in pollen, especially when the local pollen count is high. Set your air conditioners to re-circulate in your home and vehicle, to avoid drawing in outside pollen-rich air.
  • The pollen counts are the highest between 5am and 10am, so limiting your outside exposure during those times can be extremely helpful for diminishing your allergies.
  • Limit exposure on mornings that are especially warm and dry; these will usually be the high pollen count days. Days that are dry and windy also have high pollen counts. The best time for outdoor activities is immediately following a heavy rainfall.
  • Avoid line drying your clothes and bedding outdoors when your
    local pollen count is high.  Use an indoor rack instead.
  • Wash your face and hands after you’ve been outside to remove pollen. Also, change and wash clothes if they’ve been exposed to pollen.
  • Bathe and shampoo hair daily before going to bed to remove pollen from hair and skin in order to keep it off your bedding. Wash bedding in hot, soapy water once a week.
  • Minimize contact with items that have come in contact with pollen, such as pets and people that have spent a large amount of time outdoors.
  • Wear sunglasses to protect your eyes from pollen, and in severe allergy cases, wear a facemask when daily pollen counts are extremely high.

If you are in the Portland area and think you may have allergies, you can get allergy testing with one of the following clinics:

http://www.aadapc.com/

http://bakeraad.com/

http://www.allergyclinic.net/barzin-khalili-md

 

Training With the Flow by Amanda Roe, ND March 15, 2017

Filed under: diet,nutrition,running,women's health — tollecausum @ 10:08 am
Tags: , , , , ,

Having a uterus and ultrarunning is generally pretty rad. There is nothing like running into some badass women in the woods, tearing up the trails and having a great time. We push each other to be better, dream bigger, run stronger. How many times have you been digging deep for the next internal power surge to arise and been inspired either by thinking of another woman runner, or witnessed within yourself that core sense of knowing you’ll rise to the occasion? We lift one another up in this sport. In the interest of elevating women in sports, let’s lift the mystique of that monthly visitor that can throw a bit of a wrench into an otherwise finely tuned machine. Periods run interference on even the best training schedules and can set you back a week or two at a time. Most of us are already balancing our running with career, family, and the odd (gasp) other pastimes besides running.

Raise your hand if any of the following scenarios sounds familiar. I know.

“I was packing the car up a few months ago to leave for an early morning race. I ran back in the house to pee only to find that Aunt Flo came by to wish me luck. The race was set to start in 2 hours. I thought she was coming on Tuesday!”

“I’m scheduled for a long run on the weekend, but have been bleeding and cramping for the past two days. My legs feel weak, my back hurts, and I would eat a Taco Bell Party Pack faster than a gaggle of teenaged boys right now. How can I cement the wherewithal to get 20 miles in bright and early? My 50K is 6 weeks.”

“Looking ahead at my race calendar, again I count the weeks to go: seven weeks until the next race. I have my period this week. It should be 8 more weeks until ‘that time of the month’, but it’s going to be a close call. Can’t I just plug it up and pretend it’s not happening??”

There are so many factors that affect our biggest days out there racing and training, and uterine behavior (or misbehavior) doesn’t need to be another big unknown. Getting a general sense of your cycle can empower you to do all the right things to guide your body toward training and racing strong, before, during, and after your period.

HERE COMES AUNT FLO: Running before period (Days 15-28 of cycle)

Hydration is key. There are a lot of hormones leaving the system during this time, and it can feel akin to a detox. For women who experience premenstrual headaches, be extra sure to keep those electrolytes balanced and the excretion (ahem, peeing and moving your bowels) humming along. If you’re up for it, a trip to the sauna or hot yoga class can aid with the processing.
Decreasing inflammation is also vital, particularly if you get bad cramps or have endometriosis. Focus on foods high in essential fatty acids, known for decreasing cramping and clotting, like olives and olive oil, avocado, nuts, seeds, fatty fish (like salmon, cod and halibut). Decrease coffee, alcohol, and limit sugar, as these amplify inflammatory pathways in the body.

SHARK WEEK: Running during period (Days 1-7 of cycle)

Use your discretion in determining when and how much to run. For some women, the increased circulation from exercise actually helps relieve cramping and clotting. For other women, running can cause more fatigue. Eat iron-rich foods: dark leafy greens, eggs, beets, poultry, and beef. Combining iron-rich foods with Vitamin C or foods high in Vitamin C (citrus, spinach, berries) will help your body absorb more iron naturally. Magnesium can also help a bunch. Epsom salt baths are great way to relieve muscular tension from cramping, low back pain, and leg pain.

GETTING OFF THE COTTON PONY: Running after period. (Days 7-14 of cycle)

Sleep is your buddy, and you’re likely to be feeling much better now that your body is resetting. Treat it to some daily nourishing blood-builders like spinach, black beans, dates, and carrots to stay on top of your game. Run strong, and tear it up out there, my friends!

 

Top Docs Portland January 1, 2017

Filed under: Uncategorized — tollecausum @ 10:59 am

It is with a heaping TON of gratitude to my colleagues and patients that I’m sharing being voted a Portland Top Doc for 2016.  You guys fuel my passions and my constant quest for knowledge to better serve you.  Big hugs and high-fives all-around!!!

TopDocs-2016 portland.jpg

 

 

Radiation protection, re-visited April 19, 2012

It’s been just over a year since the Nuclear meltdown in Japan.  We had a lot of concerns about radiation for a month or two, and then things sort of simmered down.

However, I recently had a patient ask me what she could do to protect her young children from the effects of increased radiation in our atmosphere.  There’s a lot out there on the web.  Weeding through all of it to determine an effective set of guidelines for families with little ones (or pregnant ones!) has been my pet project for the past few weeks.

Without further ado, I present “Dr. Roe’s Radiation Protection Plan”

1. An apple a day.  Pectins (found in apples) are probably the most well-studied food source for radiation protection, even after exposure has occurred.  People in the Chernobyl radiation zone have been advised for years and years now to consume apples on a regular basis to help the body absorb and eliminate excess radiation.

2. Eat iodine-containing foods, and keep a source of iodine on hand for your family in the medicine cabinet.  There is no need to supplement Iodine on a regular basis, and this can, in fact, put people over the age of 40 at risk for thyroid cancer.

3. Add Spirulina to Smoothies or, even better, applesauce a few times per week.  Spirulina also shows the ability to bind radioactive isotopes so that the body can more readily eliminate them.

4. Find a reputable source for Kombucha tea, and drink it 3-6 times per week (8oz serving).  Besides, the hot-link there, I was able to easily find lots of evidence to show the anti-oxidant, free radical scavenging, radiation-busting effects of this ancient beverage.

5. Most of all, be healthy.  Eat whole foods.  Drink water.  Take a daily multivitamin (a good one!!!!)  Avoid sugar and processed foods to keep all of your organ systems intact and functioning properly.  Your body’s ability to combat radiation exposure is only as strong as it is healthy.

So there you have it, the naturopathic doctor-approved, weeded-out version of Radiation Protection, 101.